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Mental vaccines: can resilience and adaptation of vulnerable individuals and populations be enhanced before disasters and crises?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2021

Uriel Halbreich
Affiliation:
MD, is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of Bio-Behavioral Research at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY-AB), USA. He is the Founding Chair of the World Psychiatric Association Section on Interdisciplinary Collaboration. He was the Founding President of the International Association of Women's Mental Health and is a past President of the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology.
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Summary

The worldwide stress that is a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic illuminates the need for mental preventive actions. Such ‘mental vaccines’ should be interdisciplinary and culturally sensitive. They should enhance resilience and adaptation of communities as well as vulnerable individuals.

Type
Clinical Reflection
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Royal College of Psychiatrists

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Footnotes

*

An earlier version of these ideas was presented at the World Federation for Mental Health–World Psychiatric Association (WFMH–WPA) International Congress on Crises and Disasters: Psychosocial Consequences, 6–9 March 2013, Athens, Greece.

References

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