Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Foraging characteristics of an assemblage of four Sumatran hornbill species

  • YOK-YOK HADIPRAKARSA (a1) and MARGARET F. KINNAIRD (a1) (a2)

Abstract

This study examines the diets of four hornbill species (Bushy-crested Hornbill Anorrhinus galeritus, Wreathed Hornbill Aceros undulatus, Rhinoceros Hornbill Buceros rhinoceros and Helmeted Hornbill Buceros vigil) common within our 9 km2 study area in the Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia. Line transects and opportunistic sampling were used over one year to collect feeding data, including the tree species and strata in which birds fed, diet items, fruit characteristics and tree crop size. Hornbills fed on 64 species. Figs, non-fig fruits and animals comprised 23.4% (n = 15 species) 51.6% (n = 33 species) and 25% (n = 16 species) of the diet, respectively. Although there was overlap among the diets of the four species, only B. rhinoceros and B. vigil had a statistically significant overlap, primarily due to high fig consumption by both species. B. vigil fed almost exclusively on figs (98.6% of the diet) and a small proportion of animals (1.4%) while 23.1% of the B. rhinoceros diet comprised non-fig fruits and animals (23.1%), with 76.9% figs. A. galeritus and A. undulatus had distinct diets with drupaceous, oily fruits comprising 66.7% and 64.4% of the diets, respectively. We found no significant relationship between the numbers of hornbills visiting fruiting trees and the characteristics of the fruit (weight, length and width). However, maximum crop sizes of diet species significantly influenced the number of feeding hornbills. Hornbill species also differed in the strata in which they fed. A. galeritus and B. rhinoceros were seen in the middle of the canopy 56% and 50.8% of the time, respectively while A. undulatus and B. vigil were observed more frequently in the upper canopy (50% and 74.3% of the time, respectively). The lower part of the canopy was used infrequently by all species. This study suggests that the four hornbill species in our study partition food resources by food type and/or feeding location.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Foraging characteristics of an assemblage of four Sumatran hornbill species
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Foraging characteristics of an assemblage of four Sumatran hornbill species
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Foraging characteristics of an assemblage of four Sumatran hornbill species
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Foraging characteristics of an assemblage of four Sumatran hornbill species

  • YOK-YOK HADIPRAKARSA (a1) and MARGARET F. KINNAIRD (a1) (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed