Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-67gxp Total loading time: 0.25 Render date: 2021-03-04T22:33:45.361Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Editorial

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2001

Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Bird Conservation International fills an important niche in the scientific literature by providing a forum for applied research of high utility to conservation biologists, often from research carried out as part of conservation projects. As such, it provides an outlet for research which might otherwise remain in the ‘grey’ literature. This is largely thanks to a cosmopolitan list of contributors, both amateur and professional, including academics and those working for conser vation organisations, from all corners of the globe. To anyone reading this who is working in bird conservation research, I hope BCI is near the top of the list of journals you would like to publish your work in.

BCI's remit is to cover ‘subjects relevant to the conservation of birds’, allowing an eclectic mix of topics while maintaining a focus on bird conservation. In Volume 10 alone, 17 papers were studies of individual bird species, of which 15 are listed as globally threatened or near-threatened by BirdLife International (2000). A further nine papers were studies of habitats or regions. The focus of papers in the journal is diverse, and last year topics included baseline surveys, comparisons of bird communities in natural and disturbed habitats, conservation management advice, morpho logical variation, and molecular systematics. Additionally, regular ‘Opinion’ papers provide a forum for the discussion of conservation issues of the day. In covering such a wide range of subjects, every issue should include information of value to those involved or interested in conservation, not only of birds. The journal also has a truly international flavour: papers in Volume 10 resulted from studies in 17 different countries, from six of the world's seven continents, and were contributed by authors based in 14 different countries.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© BirdLife International 2001

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 60 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Editorial
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Editorial
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Editorial
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *