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The role of learning on bilinguals’ lexical architecture: Beyond separated vs. integrated lexicons

  • ALBERT COSTA (a1) (a2) and MARTIN J. PICKERING (a3)

Extract

How are the two lexicons of a bilingual represented and how do they interact during language processing? These questions are central to bilingualism and have been the topics of a large number of studies. Dijkstra, Wahl, Buytenhuijs, van Halem, Al-jibouri, De Korte & Rekke (in press) put forward a model that tries to capture people's behavior in several tasks mostly involving reading, with the exception of word translation. A praise-worthy feature of the model is that it is computationally implemented following a local-connectionist architecture. The model is then used to quantitatively account for reaction time patterns on various tasks, with considerable success.

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Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Albert Costam, Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Center for Brain and Cognition, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, 08018Spaincostalbert@gmail.com

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*This article was supported by two grants from the Spanish Government (PSI2011-23033, and PSI2014-52181-P), a grant from the Catalan Government (AGAUR SGR 268), and a grant from the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013 Cooperation grant agreement n° 613465 – AThEME)

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References

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Costa, A., Pannunzi, M., Deco, G., & Pickering, M.J. (2017). Do Bilinguals Automatically Activate Their Native Language When They Are Not Using It? Cognitive Science, 41 (6), pp. 16291644.
Dijkstra, A., Wahl, A., Buytenhuijs, F., van Halem, N., Al-jibouri, Z., de Korte, M., & Rekké, S. (2018). Multilink: a computational model for bilingual word recognition and word translation. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, doi:10.1017/S1366728918000287.
Oppenheim, G, Wu, Y.Y., & Thierry, G. (in press) Found in translation: Late bilinguals do automatically activate their native language when they are not using it. Cognitive Science.
Strijkers, K., Costa, A., & Thierry, G. (2010). Tracking lexical access in speech production: Electrophysiological correlates of word frequency and cognate effects. Cerebral Cortex, 20 (4), pp. 912928

The role of learning on bilinguals’ lexical architecture: Beyond separated vs. integrated lexicons

  • ALBERT COSTA (a1) (a2) and MARTIN J. PICKERING (a3)

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