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Let's not forget the role of deafness in sign/speech bilingualism*

  • BENCIE WOLL (a1) and MAIRÉAD MACSWEENEY (a2)

Extract

Emmorey, Giezen and Gollan (Emmorey, Giezen & Gollan) address the fascinating question of what can be learnt about language, cognition and the brain from the unique group of people who have grown up learning both a signed and a spoken language. The focus of their review is hearing individuals – referred to as hearing bimodal bilinguals. The review presents an excellent overview of research in this field and highlights the unique insights that this population can provide.

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Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Mairead MacSweeney, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square London WC1N 3AR m.macsweeney@ucl.ac.uk

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*

We acknowledge the support of a Wellcome Trust Fellowship to MM (GR075214MA) and a Centre Grant from the Economic and Social Research Council of Great Britain (RES-620-28-6001) to B.W. and M.M.

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References

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Let's not forget the role of deafness in sign/speech bilingualism*

  • BENCIE WOLL (a1) and MAIRÉAD MACSWEENEY (a2)

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