Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Measuring Risk-Taking In Obseessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Extension Of The Everyday Risk Inventory With An Australian Sample

  • Tina Cicolini (a1) and Clare S. Rees (a2)

Abstract

In order to function effectively in our day-to-day lives we must all take risks. These risks may be as simple as crossing a road or as complex as deciding whether or not to purchase a new home. The behaviour of individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) has been variously described as “harm-avoidant” (Cloninger, 1987) or “risk-aversive” (Carr, 1974). Despite the use of different terminology, there is consensus that individuals with OCD avoid taking risk. Further information regarding the type and extent of risks avoided has been difficult to obtain due to limitations in defining and therefore measuring the concept. Few studies have examined the concept of risk-taking with populations outside the United States, and none could be identified that examined risk-taking with OCD populations in Australia. In an effort to clarify the role of risk-taking behaviour in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, this study extended upon earlier work of Steketee and Frost (1994). This study administered a revised version of the Everyday Risk Inventory (ERI), developed by Steketee and Frost (1994) to assess risk-taking behaviour in an obsessive-compulsive population. Consistent with the original ERI (Steketee & Frost, 1994), the Australian adaptation of the ERI (ERI-AUS) produced sound internal consistency. As expected, we found that clinical OCD outpatients scored significantly lower on the ERI-AUS as compared to their non-clinical counterparts, and a clear linear trend emerged when risk-taking in people exhibiting sub-clinical OC symptoms was considered. Results suggested a potential inverse relationship between OCD symptoms and risk-taking. The cross-cultural comparison of the Australian non-clinical and American non-clinical (Steketee & Frost) samples revealed significantly higher rates of risk-taking for the latter group. The findings suggest that the concept of risk can be measured effectively with the ERI-AUS, and that further studies examining risk-taking are warranted.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Reprint requests to Clare Rees, School of Psychology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. E-mail: c.rees@curtin.edu.au

Keywords

Measuring Risk-Taking In Obseessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Extension Of The Everyday Risk Inventory With An Australian Sample

  • Tina Cicolini (a1) and Clare S. Rees (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

Measuring Risk-Taking In Obseessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Extension Of The Everyday Risk Inventory With An Australian Sample

  • Tina Cicolini (a1) and Clare S. Rees (a2)
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *