Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE AND SOCIAL-SKILL DEFICITS AS PREDICTORS OF DYSPHORIC STATES AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT

  • Carmen Rodriguez-Naranjo (a1), Antonio Godoy (a1) and Rosa Esteve (a1)

Abstract

It is hypothesized that there might be two subtypes of dysphoria. Comparison of the characteristic deficits of attributional styles and social skills of adolescent dysphorics differentiated them into two subtypes. This suggested that matched treatments of the two subtypes of dysphoria might be more effective than non-matched treatments. As is predicted by the hopelessness theory of depression (Alloy, Abramson, Metalsky, & Hartlage, 1988), dysphorics characterized by the depressogenic attributional style and adequate social skills reported significantly greater numbers of negative life-events than dysphorics characterized by social-skill deficits and healthy attributional style. Treatments matched to dysphoria subtypes were more effective than non-matched treatments. The authors suggest that similar tests of dysphorics over several years might indicate that some dysphoric states intensify and that matched treatments would abort potentially severe depressions.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE AND SOCIAL-SKILL DEFICITS AS PREDICTORS OF DYSPHORIC STATES AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE AND SOCIAL-SKILL DEFICITS AS PREDICTORS OF DYSPHORIC STATES AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE AND SOCIAL-SKILL DEFICITS AS PREDICTORS OF DYSPHORIC STATES AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Reprint requests to Carmen Rodriguez-Naranjo, Facultad de Psicologia. Campus de Teatinos, s/n, Málaga 29071, Spain.

Keywords

ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE AND SOCIAL-SKILL DEFICITS AS PREDICTORS OF DYSPHORIC STATES AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT

  • Carmen Rodriguez-Naranjo (a1), Antonio Godoy (a1) and Rosa Esteve (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

ATTRIBUTIONAL STYLE AND SOCIAL-SKILL DEFICITS AS PREDICTORS OF DYSPHORIC STATES AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT

  • Carmen Rodriguez-Naranjo (a1), Antonio Godoy (a1) and Rosa Esteve (a1)
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *