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Treating Multiple Incident Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in an Inner City London Prison: The Need for an Evidence Base

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 February 2015

Catherine A. Campbell
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, London, UK
Idit Albert
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, London, UK
Manuela Jarrett
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, London, UK
Majella Byrne
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, London, UK
Anna Roberts
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, London, UK
Patricia Phillip
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, London, UK
Vyv Huddy
Affiliation:
South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, and University College London, UK
Lucia Valmaggia
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Hospital Trust, London, UK
Corresponding

Abstract

Background: Mental health problems have been found to be more prevalent in prison populations, and higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been found in sentenced populations compared to the general population. Evidence-based treatment in the general population however has not been transferred and empirically supported into the prison system. Aims: The aim of this manuscript is to illustrate how trauma focused work can be applied in a prison setting. Method: This report describes a two-phased approach to treating PTSD, starting with stabilization, followed by an integration of culturally appropriate ideas from narrative exposure therapy (NET), given that the traumas were during war and conflict, and trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TF-CBT). Results: PTSD and scores on paranoia scales improved between start and end of treatment; these improvements were maintained at a 6-month follow-up. Conclusion: This case report 1 illustrates successful treatment of multiple incident PTSD in a prison setting using adaptations to TF-CBT during a window of opportunity when individuals are more likely to be free from substances and live in relative stability. Current service provision and evidence-based practice for PTSD is urgently required in UK prisons to allow individuals to engage in opportunities to reduce re-offending, free from mental health symptoms.

Type
Brief Clinical Reports
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2015 

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Footnotes

An extended version is also available online in the table of contents for this issue: http://journals.cambridge.org/jid_BCP

References

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Jarrett, M., Craig, T., Parrott, J., Forrester, A., Winton-Brown, T., Maguire, H., et al. (2012). Identifying men at ultra high risk of psychosis in a prison population. Schizophrenia Research, 136, 16.Google Scholar
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Treating Multiple Incident Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in an Inner City London Prison: The Need for an Evidence Base
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