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Structure and validity of the Clinical Perfectionism Questionnaire in female adolescents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 December 2019

Chloe Y. Shu
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Amy O’Brien
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Hunna J. Watson
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
Rebecca A. Anderson
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Tracey D. Wade
Affiliation:
Discipline of Psychology, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia
Robert T. Kane
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Amy Lampard
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Sarah J. Egan
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

Background:

Perfectionism is a transdiagnostic risk factor across psychopathology. The Clinical Perfectionism Questionnaire (CPQ) was developed to assess change in order to provide clinical utility, but currently the psychometric properties of the CPQ with adolescents is unknown.

Aims:

To assess the factor structure and construct validity of the CPQ in female adolescents.

Method:

The CPQ was administered to 267 females aged 14–19 years of age. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the validity of the two-factor model and a second-order factor model. Pearson correlations were used to evaluate the relationships between the CPQ and a wide range of measures of perfectionism, psychopathology and personality traits.

Results:

The study demonstrated internal consistency, construct validity and incremental validity of the CPQ in a sample of female adolescents. The CFA in the present study confirmed the two-factor model of the CPQ with Factor 1 relating to perfectionistic strivings and Factor 2 representing perfectionistic concerns. The second-order two factor model indicated no deterioration in fit.

Conclusions:

The two-factor model of the CPQ fits with the theoretical definition of clinical perfectionism where the over-dependence of self-worth on achievement and concern over mistakes are key elements. The CPQ is suitable for use with female adolescents in future research that seeks to better understand the role of perfectionism in the range of mental illnesses that impact youth.

Type
Main
Copyright
© British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2019

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