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Psychometric properties of the Cognitive and Behavioural Responses Questionnaire (CBRQ) in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2019

M. E. Loades
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, UK Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
S. Vitoratou
Affiliation:
Psychometrics & Measurement Lab, Department of Biostatistics and Health Informatics, King’s College London, London, UK
K. A. Rimes
Affiliation:
King’s College London, London, UK
S. Ali
Affiliation:
South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, Beckenham, UK
T. Chalder
Affiliation:
King’s College London, London, UK South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, Beckenham, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

To better understand the maintenance of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a valid and reliable measure of cognitive and behavioural responses to symptoms is required. Such a measure could also assess beliefs and coping behaviours in the context of fatigue in other somatic conditions.

Aims:

We aimed to establish the psychometric properties of both the Cognitive and Behavioural Responses Questionnaire (CBRQ) and its shortened version (CBRQ-S) in adolescents with CFS.

Method:

The full questionnaire was completed by a clinical cohort of adolescents (n = 121) presenting to specialist CFS units in the UK.

Results:

Both the CBRQ and CBRQ-S had good internal consistency. The CBRQ scores were strongly associated with depression, anxiety, school and social functioning, but weakly associated with fatigue and physical functioning, providing evidence of validity.

Conclusion:

Both the 40-item and the 18-item versions of the CBRQ were found to be reliable and valid in adolescents with CFS. To minimize unnecessary burden, the 18-item version is favoured. Using this assessment tool in future studies, including intervention studies, may help to better target interventions during clinical practice and improve outcomes.

Type
Main
Copyright
© British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2019 

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