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Pilot Study of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Trainee Clinical Psychologists

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2010

Katharine A. Rimes
Affiliation:
University of Bath, UK
Janet Wingrove
Affiliation:
South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background: It is recommended that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) instructors should undertake MBCT themselves before teaching others. Aim: To investigate the impact of MBCT (modified for stress not depression) on trainee clinical psychologists. Method: Twenty trainees completed questionnaires pre- and post-MBCT. Results: There was a significant decrease in rumination, and increases in self-compassion and mindfulness. More frequent home practice was associated with larger decreases in stress, anxiety and rumination, and larger increases in empathic concern. Only first-year trainees showed a significant decrease in stress. Content analysis of written responses indicated that the most commonly reported effects were increased acceptance of thoughts/feelings (70%), increased understanding of what it is like to be a client (60%), greater awareness of thoughts/feelings/behaviours/bodily sensations (55%) and increased understanding of oneself and one's patterns of responding (55%). Participants reported increased metacognitive awareness and decentring in relation to negative thoughts. Eighty-five percent reported an impact on their clinical work by the end of the course. Conclusions: Trainee psychologists undergoing MBCT experienced many of the psychological processes/effects that they may eventually be helping to cultivate in clients using mindfulness interventions, and also benefits in their general clinical work.

Type
Brief Clinical Reports
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2010

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