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Low Self-Esteem: A Cognitive Perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2009

Melanie J. V. Fennell
Affiliation:
The Warneford Hospital, Oxford

Extract

Although low self-esteem is common in clinical populations, a cognitive conceptualization of the problem and an integrated treatment programme deriving from that conceptualization are as yet lacking. The paper proposes a cognitive model for low self-esteem, deriving from Beck's model of emotional disorder. It outlines a treatment programme which integrates ideas and methods from cognitive therapy for depression, anxiety and more recent work on schemas or core beliefs. The model and treatment are illustrated with an extended case example.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 1997

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