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Dealing with Feelings: The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Group Treatment for Women in Secure Settings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 November 2010

Clive G. Long
Affiliation:
St Andrew's Healthcare, and King's College London, St Andrew's Academic Centre, Northampton, UK
Barbara Fulton
Affiliation:
St Andrew's Healthcare, Northampton, UK
Olga Dolley
Affiliation:
St Andrew's Healthcare, Northampton, UK
Clive R. Hollin
Affiliation:
University of Leicester, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background: Women in secure psychiatric settings have gender specific treatment needs. The current study examined the feasibility of a Dealing with Feelings Skills Group training for dual diagnosis women admitted to a medium secure setting. Method: A pre-test – post-test design was used to evaluate a group programme adapted from dialectical behaviour therapy skills training. Results: Most patients had a primary diagnosis of personality disorder. Treatment completers (n = 29) were compared with non-completers (n = 15). Clinically significant changes in treatment completers were apparent on coping response measures of positive reappraisal, problem solving and alternative rewards; on measures of anxiety and suicidality; on self-reported ability to engage in activities to reduce negative mood and to recognize mood changes. Self-harming and aggressive behaviours also reduced in the 3 months following group treatment. Conclusion: An adapted coping skills component of DBT benefit many dual diagnosis patients: issues related to treatment drop-out and failure to benefit are discussed.

Type
Brief Clinical Reports
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2010

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