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Cognitive Therapy of Depression: The Mechanisms of Change*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2009

Melanie J. V. Fennell
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford

Extract

Evidence is now accumulating for cognitive therapy as a promising treatment for depression. However, there is as yet little indication as to how it achieves its effects. The paper addresses this issue as it relates to the immediate impact of therapy, the achievement of change over the course of treatment as a whole, and the maintenance of improvement and prevention of relapse.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 1983

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