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Behavioural Medicine: Research and Development in Disease Prevention

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2014

C. Barr Taylor
Affiliation:
Stanford University
Neville Owen
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide

Abstract

Behavioural medicine has become a popular, important and distinct field of research and clinical practice. One of the more exciting areas of behavioural medicine has been in the application of behavioural techniques to reduce cardiovascular risk-factors on a community-wide basis. Work conducted in this area highlights a key issue for the development and support of behaviour analysis and modification activities in Australia: to what extent should behavioural practitioners and their interest groups pursue a specialised, behaviour-analytic approach to the areas in which they are involved, as opposed to adopting interdisciplinary frameworks and approaches. We describe some of the activities of the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, which has been able to operate as a large, interdisciplinary organisation, guided by behavioural approaches. We also discuss some setting, provider, program and client variables relevant to research and development on health promotion and disease prevention in Australia and elsewhere.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 1989

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