Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Optimality is critical when it comes to testing computation-level hypotheses

Abstract

We disagree with Rahnev & Denison (R&D) that optimality should be abandoned altogether. Rather, we argue that adopting a normative approach enables researchers to test hypotheses about the brain's computational goals, avoids just-so explanations, and offers insights into function that are simply inaccessible to the alternatives proposed by R&D.

Copyright

Footnotes

Hide All

Authors Chetverikov and van Bergen contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
Girshick, A. R., Landy, M. S. & Simoncelli, E. P. (2011) Cardinal rules: Visual orientation perception reflects knowledge of environmental statistics. Nature Neuroscience 14(7):926–32. Available at: http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=3125404&tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract.
Marr, D. (1982) Vision: A computational investigation into the human representation and processing of visual information. W. H. Freeman.
Tomassini, A., Morgan, M. J. & Solomon, J. A. (2010) Orientation uncertainty reduces perceived obliquity. Vision Research 50:541–47.

Optimality is critical when it comes to testing computation-level hypotheses

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed