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We need to be braver about the generalizability crisis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2022

Todd S. Braver
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, St. Louis, MO63130, USAtbraver@wustl.edu; http://ccpweb.wustl.edu
Sanford L. Braver
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ85287, USAsanford.braver@asu.edu; http://www.public.asu.edu/~devra1/

Abstract

We applaud the effort to draw attention to generalizability concerns in twenty-first-century psychological research. Yet we do not feel that a pessimistic perspective is warranted. We outline a continuum of available methodological tools and perspectives, including incremental steps and meta-analytic approaches that can be readily and easily deployed by researchers to advance generalizability claims in a forward-looking manner.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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