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Universal grammar and mental continuity: Two modern myths

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2009

Derek C. Penn
Affiliation:
Cognitive Evolution Group, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, New Iberia, LA, 70560. dcpenn@ucla.eduhttp://www.cognitiveevolutiongroup.org/ceg@louisiana.eduhttp://www.cognitiveevolutiongroup.org/
Keith J. Holyoak
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095. holyoak@lifesci.ucla.eduhttp://reasoninglab.psych.ucla.edu/
Daniel J. Povinelli
Affiliation:
Cognitive Evolution Group, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, New Iberia, LA, 70560. dcpenn@ucla.eduhttp://www.cognitiveevolutiongroup.org/ceg@louisiana.eduhttp://www.cognitiveevolutiongroup.org/

Abstract

In our opinion, the discontinuity between extant human and nonhuman minds is much broader and deeper than most researchers admit. We are happy to report that Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) target article strongly corroborates our unpopular hypothesis, and that the comparative evidence, in turn, bolsters E&L's provocative argument. Both a Universal Grammar and the “mental continuity” between human and nonhuman minds turn out to be modern myths.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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