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Unique features of human movement control predicted by the leading joint hypothesis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Natalia Dounskaia
Affiliation:
Kinesiology Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-0701. natalia.dounskaia@asu.eduhttps://webapp4.asu.edu/directory/person/222701

Abstract

Vaesen suggests that motor control is not among the primary origins of the uniqueness of human tool use. However, recent findings show that cognitive processes involved in control of human limb movements may be much more sophisticated than it was believed previously. The sophistication of movement control may substantially contribute to the uniqueness of humans in tool use.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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References

Dounskaia, N. (2005) The internal model and the leading joint hypothesis: Implications for control of multi-joint movements. Experimental Brain Research 166:116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dounskaia, N. (2010) Control of human limb movements: The leading joint hypothesis and its practical applications. Exercise and Sport Science Reviews 38:201208.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dounskaia, N. & Goble, J. (2011) The role of vision, speed and attention in overcoming directional biases during arm movements. Experimental Brain Research 209:299309.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dounskaia, N., Goble, J. & Wang, W. (2011) The role of intrinsic factors in control of arm movement direction: Implications from directional preferences. Journal of Neurophysiology 105:9991010.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goble, J. A., Zhang, Y., Shimansky, Y., Sharma, S. & Dounskaia, N. V. (2007) Directional biases reveal utilization of arm's biomechanical properties for optimization of motor behavior. Journal of Neurophysiology 98:1240–52.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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