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Trace conditioning, awareness, and the propositional nature of associative learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 April 2009

Nanxin Li
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520. nanxin.li@yale.eduhttp://pantheon.yale.edu/~nl238
Corresponding
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Abstract

The propositional nature of human associative learning is strongly supported by studies of trace eyeblink and fear conditioning, in which awareness of the contingency of a conditioned stimulus upon an unconditioned stimulus is a prerequisite for successful learning. Studies of animal lesion and human imaging suggest that the hippocampus is critical for establishing functional connections between awareness and trace conditioning.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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