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Right answer to the wrong question: A reply to Jung and Haier

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2007

Robert J. Sternberg
Affiliation:
Office of the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155. robert.sternberg@tufts.edu

Abstract

Jung & Haier (J&H) have done an admirable job of solving the wrong problem. Their article does not show “where in the brain is intelligence,” because intelligence resides not in the brain but, rather, in the interaction of brain and environment. I describe four reasons why the article does not adequately localize intelligence in the brain.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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References

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