Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-5wvtr Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-20T05:06:43.425Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

The questionable utility of “cognitive ability” in explaining cognitive illusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 April 2001

Ralph Hertwig
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Human Development, 14195 Berlin, Germanyhertwig@mpib-berlin.mpg.de www.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/ABC/Staff/Hertwig

Abstract

The notion of “cognitive ability” leads to paradoxical conclusions when invoked to explain Inhelder and Piaget's research on class inclusion reasoning and research on the inclusion rule in the heuristics-and-biases program. The vague distinction between associative and rule-based reasoning overlooks the human capacity for semantic and pragmatic inferences, and consequently, makes intelligent inferences look like reasoning errors.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
© 2000 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)