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P-FIT: A major contribution to theories of intelligence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2007

Earl Hunt
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Washington–Seattle, Seattle, WA 98195-1525. ehunt@u.washington.edu

Abstract

The P-FIT model is a major step forward in understanding biological causes of intelligence. It is consistent with evidence on the influence of working memory and speediness upon intelligence, and with models that emphasize the role of interaction between modules to produce intelligence. The contribution to understanding genetic contributions is problematical, due to the difficulty of isolating the genes involved.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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References

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