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Past and future, human and nonhuman, semantic/procedural and episodic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2007

James R. Hurford
Affiliation:
Language Evolution and Computation Research Unit, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 9LL, United Kingdom. jim@ling.ed.ac.ukhttp://www.ling.ed.ac.uks0672076@ling.ed.ac.uks0677134@ling.ed.ac.uk
Molly Flaherty
Affiliation:
Language Evolution and Computation Research Unit, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 9LL, United Kingdom. jim@ling.ed.ac.ukhttp://www.ling.ed.ac.uks0672076@ling.ed.ac.uks0677134@ling.ed.ac.uk
Giorgis Argyropoulos
Affiliation:
Language Evolution and Computation Research Unit, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 9LL, United Kingdom. jim@ling.ed.ac.ukhttp://www.ling.ed.ac.uks0672076@ling.ed.ac.uks0677134@ling.ed.ac.uk

Abstract

The overlap of representations of past and future is not a completely new idea. Suddendorf & Corballis (S&C) usefully discuss the problems of testing the existence of such representations. Our taxonomy of memory differs from theirs, emphasizing the late evolutionary emergence of notions of time in memory.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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Past and future, human and nonhuman, semantic/procedural and episodic
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