Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-9hjnw Total loading time: 0.243 Render date: 2022-07-03T03:55:39.427Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The neuronal basis of intelligence: A riddle, wrapped in a mystery?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2007

Marko Wilke
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine, University Children's Hospital Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. marko.wilke@med.uni-tuebingen.de

Abstract

“Where in the brain is intelligence?” is an intriguing question, and Jung & Haier (J&H) resist the temptation to provide a simple answer. Their concept tries to integrate and transcend previous findings, and, while omitting the contributions from complementary methods, results seem to converge. Whether similarities or differences in such networks are more important, though, is still open for discussion.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Broca, M. P. (1861) Remarques sur le siège de la faculté du langage articulé, suivies d'une observation d'aphemie (Perte de la Parole). Bulletin de la Société Anatomique Paris 36:330–57.Google Scholar
Gleissner, U., Sassen, R., Schramm, J., Elger, C. E. & Helmstaedter, C. (2005) Greater functional recovery after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in children. Brain 128:2822–29.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Honea, R., Crow, T. J., Passingham, D. & Mackay, C. E. (2005) Regional deficits in brain volume in schizophrenia: A meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry studies. American Journal of Psychiatry 162:2233–45.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Krägeloh-Mann, I. (2004) Imaging of early brain injury and cortical plasticity. Experimental Neurology 190:S8490.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lidzba, K., Staudt, M., Wilke, M. & Krägeloh-Mann, I. (2006) Visuospatial deficits in patients with early left-hemispheric lesions and functional reorganization of language: Consequence of lesion or reorganization? Neuropsychologia 44:1088–94.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCarley, R. W., Wible, C. G., Frumin, M., Hirayasu, Y., Levitt, J. J., Fischer, I. A. & Shenton, M. E. (1999) MRI anatomy of schizophrenia. Biological Psychiatry 45:1099–119.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pavlova, M., Sokolov, A., Birbaumer, N. & Krägeloh-Mann, I. (2006) Biological motion processing in adolescents with early periventricular brain damage. Neuropsychologia 44:586–93.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rapoport, J. L., Addington, A. M., Frangou, S. & Psych, M. R. (2005) The neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia: Update 2005. Molecular Psychiatry 10:434–49.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Staudt, M., Lidzba, K., Grodd, W., Wildgruber, D., Erb, M. & Krägeloh-Mann, I. (2002) Right-hemispheric organization of language following early left-sided brain lesions: Functional MRI topography. NeuroImage 16:954–67.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thatcher, R. W., North, D. & Biver, C. (2007) Intelligence and EEG current density using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Human Brain Mapping 28:118–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thorndike, E. L. (1921) Intelligence and its measurement: A symposium. Journal of Educational Psychology 12:124–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yuan, W., Szaflarski, J. P., Schmithorst, V. J., Schapiro, M., Byars, A. W., Strawsburg, R. H. & Holland, S. K. (2006) fMRI shows atypical language lateralization in pediatric epilepsy patients. Epilepsia 47:593600.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The neuronal basis of intelligence: A riddle, wrapped in a mystery?
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The neuronal basis of intelligence: A riddle, wrapped in a mystery?
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The neuronal basis of intelligence: A riddle, wrapped in a mystery?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *