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Neurocognitive anthropology: What are the options?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Guy Vingerhoets
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Neuropsychology, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. guy.vingerhoets@ugent.be

Abstract

Investigation of the cerebral organization of cognition in modern humans may serve as a tool for a better understanding of the evolutionary origins of our unique cognitive abilities. This commentary suggests three approaches that may serve this purpose: (1) cross-task neural overlap, referred to by Vaesen; but also (2) co-lateralization of asymmetric cognitive functions and (3) cross-functional (effective) connectivity.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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References

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