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Metacognition and conscious experience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2016

Bennett L. Schwartz
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Florida International University, University Park, Miami, FL 33199. bennett.schwartz@fiu.edu apour005@fiu.edu www.bennettschwartz.com
Ali Pournaghdali
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Florida International University, University Park, Miami, FL 33199. bennett.schwartz@fiu.edu apour005@fiu.edu www.bennettschwartz.com
Corresponding

Abstract

Morsella et al. focus on the conscious nature of sensation. However, also critical to an understanding of consciousness is the role of internally generated experience, such as the content of autobiographical memory or metacognitive experiences. For example, tip-of-the-tongue states are conscious feelings that arise when recall fails. Internally driven experiences drive us to action and therefore are consistent with the current approach.

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Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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