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The link between deprivation and its behavioural constellation is confounded by genetic factors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2017

James M. Sherlock
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072, Queensland, Australia. james.sherlock@uqconnect.edu.auzietsch@psy.uq.edu.au
Brendan P. Zietsch
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072, Queensland, Australia. james.sherlock@uqconnect.edu.auzietsch@psy.uq.edu.au Genetic Epidemiology, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

Most research cited throughout Pepper & Nettle's (P&N's) target article is correlational and suffers from a serious genetic confound that renders it of little evidentiary value. Of correlational findings that are not confounded, P&N ignore examples that contradict their model. Further, P&N's claim that evolutionary models explaining between-species differences in behaviour can be used to understand that corresponding individual differences lack any evidence.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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