Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-vddjc Total loading time: 1.332 Render date: 2021-04-18T09:17:18.407Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Intelligence, hormones, sex, brain size, and biochemistry: It all needs to have equal causal standing before integration is possible

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2007

Helmuth Nyborg
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus, DK-8362 Horning, Denmark. helmuthnyborg@msn.comwww.helmuthnyborg.dk
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Recent brain imaging points to differences in brain structure that relate to intelligence, but how do we model their causal relationship within a coherent framework that circumvents classic dualist traps? A bottom-level nonlinear, dynamic, multifactor, multiplicative, multidimensional, molecular (ND4M) trait-covariance time-space model may accomplish this better than traditional approaches.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Allen, J. S, Damasio, H., Grabowski, T. J., Bruss, J. & Zhang, W. (2003) Sexual dimorphism and asymmetries in the gray-white composition of the human cerebrum. NeuroImage 18:880–94.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gur, R. C., Turetsky, B. I., Matsui, M., Yan, M., Bilker, W., Hughett, P. & Gur, R. E. (1999) Sex differences in brain grey and white matter in healthy young adults: Correlations with cognitive performance. Journal of Neuroscience 19(10):4065–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haier, R. J., Chueh, D., Touchette, P., Lott, I., Buchsbaum, M. S., Macmillan, D., Sandman, C., Lacasse, L. & Sosa, E. (1995) Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate in nonspecific mental retardation and Down syndrome. Intelligence 20(2):191210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haier, R. J., Jung, R. E., Yeo, R. A., Head, K. & Alkire, M. T. (2004) Structural brain variation and general intelligence. NeuroImage 23(1):425–33.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jackson, D. N. & Rushton, J. P. (2006) Males have greater g: Sex differences in general mental ability from 100,000 17- to 18-year-olds on the Scholastic Assessment Test. Intelligence 34:479–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jensen, A. R. (1998) The g factor: The science of mental ability. Praeger.Google Scholar
Kimura, D. & Hampson, E. (1994) Cognitive pattern in men and women is influenced by fluctuations in sex hormones. Current Directions in Psychological Science 3:5761.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lynn, R. (1999) Sex difference in intelligence and brain size: A developmental theory. Intelligence 27:112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nyborg, H. (1983) Spatial ability in men and women: Review and new theory. Advances in Human Research and Therapy 5:39140.Google Scholar
Nyborg, H. (1994) Hormones, sex, and society: The science of physicology. Praeger.Google Scholar
Nyborg, H. (1997) Molecular man in a molecular world: Applied physicology. Psyche and Logos 18:457–74.Google Scholar
Nyborg, H. (2003) Sex differences in g. In: The scientific study of general intelligence: Tribute to Arthur R. Jensen, ed. Nyborg, H., pp. 187222. Pergamon Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nyborg, H. (2005) Sex-related differences in general intelligence g, brain size, and social status. Personality and Individual Differences 39(3):497509.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pennington, B. F., Filipek, P. A., Lefly, D., Chhabildas, N., Kennedy, D. N., Simon, J. H., Filley, C. M., Galaburda, A. & DeFries, J. C. (2000) A twin MRI study of size variations in human brain. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(1):223–32.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spearman, C. (1904) General intelligence, objectively determined and measured. American Journal of Psychology 15:201–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Toga, A. W. & Thompson, P. M. (2005) Genetics of brain structure and intelligence. Annual Review of Neuroscience 28:123.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 12
Total number of PDF views: 60 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 18th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Intelligence, hormones, sex, brain size, and biochemistry: It all needs to have equal causal standing before integration is possible
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Intelligence, hormones, sex, brain size, and biochemistry: It all needs to have equal causal standing before integration is possible
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Intelligence, hormones, sex, brain size, and biochemistry: It all needs to have equal causal standing before integration is possible
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *