Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Iconic memory or icon?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2010


Siu L. Chow
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, N.S.W., Australia 2500

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article

Type
Continuing Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Adelson, E. H. (1983) What is iconic storage good for? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:1112.Google Scholar
Allik, J. & Bachmann, T. (1983) How bad is the icon? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:1213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boynton, R. M. (1983) On “raw perception” of the “stimulus itself.” Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Breitmeyer, B. G. (1983) Icon as visual persistence: Alive and well. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:1516.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, S. E. (1969) Retrieval of colour information from preperceptual memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82:263–66.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Coltheart, M. (1980). Iconic memory and visible persistence. Perception δ Psychophysics 27:240–47.Google ScholarPubMed
Coltheart, M. (1983) Ecological necessity of iconic memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:1718.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coren, S. (1983) Icons: To see or not to see. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:1819.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eriksen, C. W. & Collins, J. F. (1967) Some temporal characteristics of visual pattern perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74:476–84.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Feigl, H. (1970) The “orthodox” view of theories: Remarks in defense as well as critique. In: Analysis of theories and methods of physics and psychology. Minnesota studies in the philosophy of science, vol. 4, ed. Radner, M. & Winokur, S.. University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
Haber, R. N., ed. (1969) Information processing approaches to visual perception. Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
Haber, R. N. (1971) Where are the visions in visual perception? In: Imagery: Current cognitive approaches, ed. Segal, S. J.. Academic Press.Google Scholar
Haber, R. N. (1983r) The icon is finally dead. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:4350.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haber, R. N. & Hershenson, M. (1980) The psychology of visual perception, 2nd ed.Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
Haber, R. N. & Standing, L. G. (1969) Direct measures of short-term visual storage. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 21:4354.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hauske, G., Wolf, W. & Deubel, H. (1983) The dependence of perception on persisting images and “icons.” Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:2122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Julesz, B. (1983) Textons, rapid focal attention shifts, and iconic memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:2527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klatzky, R. L. (1983) The icon is dead: Long live the icon. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:2728.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loftus, G. R. (1983) The continuing persistence of the icon. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Massaro, D. (1983) Icons and iconoclasts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sperling, G. (1960) The information available in brief visual presentations. Psychological Monographs 74 (11, Whole No. 498).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turvey, M. T. (1973) On peripheral and central processes in vision: Inferences from an information processing analysis of masking with patterned stimuli. Psychological Review 80:152.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Turvey, M. T. & Kravetz, S. (1970) Retrieval from iconic memory with shape as the selection criterion. Perception it Psychophysics 8:171–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Uttal, W. R. (1983) Don't exterminate perceptual fruit flies! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6:3940.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
von Wright, J. M. (1968) Selection in visual immediate memory. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 20:6268.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 17 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-pwkpp Total loading time: 0.248 Render date: 2020-12-04T18:34:18.224Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Fri Dec 04 2020 18:00:08 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Iconic memory or icon?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Iconic memory or icon?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Iconic memory or icon?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *