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Functional connectivity in the brain and human intelligence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2007

Vincent J. Schmithorst
Affiliation:
Pediatric Neuroimaging Research Consortium, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229. vince.schmithorst@cchmc.orghttp://www.irc.cchmc.org

Abstract

A parieto-frontal integration theory (P-FIT) model of human intelligence has been proposed based on a review of neuroimaging literature and lesion studies. The P-FIT model provides an important basis for future research. Future studies involving connectivity analyses and an integrative approach of imaging modalities using the P-FIT model should provide vastly increased understanding of the biological bases of intelligence.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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