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For public policies, our evolved psychology is the problem and the solution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2014

Nicolas Baumard*
Affiliation:
Institut d'Etudes Cognitives, Ecole Normale Supérieure, 75230 Paris, France. nbaumard@gmail.comhttps://sites.google.com/site/nicolasbaumard/Home

Abstract

For the authors, evolutionary approaches should rely less on evolutionary psychology, which studies innate fixed capacities, and more on cultural selection, which emphasizes cultural learning and symbolic innovation. However, successful policies do not seem to culturally reengineer people. Rather, they work by tapping into old human instincts (fairness preference, reputation management, resource seeking) to motivate individuals to change their behaviors.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

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