Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-5j57r Total loading time: 0.365 Render date: 2021-04-23T17:24:19.843Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Event-related potentials and cognition: On unexpected events and on the utility of event-related potentials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2011

Rolf Verleger
Affiliation:
Neurologie, Medizinische Universität, 2400 Lübeck, Germany

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.
Type
Author's Response
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bentin, S. (1987) Event-related potentials, semantic processes, and expectancy factors in word recognition. Brain and Language 20:119. [rED]Google Scholar
Bentin, S., McCarthy, G. & Wood, C. C. (1985) Event-related potentials, lexical decision and semantic priming. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 60:343–55. [rED]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Birbaurner, N. & Elbert, T. (1988) P3: Byproduct of a byproduct. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11:375–77. [MJ]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coles, M. G. H. (1989) Modem mind-brain reading: Psychophysiology, physiology, and cognition. Psychophysiology 26:251–69. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coles, M. G. H., Gratton, G., Bashore, T. R., Eriksen, C. W. & Donchin, E. (1985) A psychophysiological investigation of the continuous flow model of human information processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 11:529–53. [rED, rRV]Google ScholarPubMed
Coles, M. G. H., Gratton, G. & Donchin, E. (1988) Detecting early communication: Using measures of movement-related potentials to illuminate human information processing. Biological Psychology 26:6989. [rED]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Courchesne, E. (1978) Changes in P3 waves with event repetition: Long term effects on scalp distribution and amplitude. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 45:754–66. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Courchesne, E., Hillyard, S. A. &Galambos, R. (1975) Stimulus novelty, task relevance, and the visual evoked potential in man. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 39:131–43. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
De Jong, R., Coles, M. G. H., Logan, G. D. & Gratton, G. (1990) In search of the point of no return: The control of response processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 16:164182. [rRV]Google ScholarPubMed
De Jong, R., Wierda, M., Mulder, G. & Mulder, L. J. M. (1988) Use of partial stimulus information in response processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 14:682–92. [rRV]Google ScholarPubMed
Donchin, E. (1981) Surprise! … Surprise? Psychophysiology 18:493513. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Donchin, E. & Coles, M. G. H. (1988a) Is the P300 component a manifestation of context updating? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11:357–74. [rED, PU]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
(1988b) On the conceptual foundations of cognitive psychophysiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11:406–17. [rED]Google Scholar
Donchin, E., Kubovy, M., Kutas, M., Johnson, R., Jr. & Herning, R. I. (1973) Graded changes in evoked response (P300) amplitude as a function of cognitive activity. Perception ir Psychophysics 14:319–24. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Donders, F. C. (1868/1969) On the speed of mental processes (trans. W. G. Koster). In: Attention and performance II, ed. Koster, W. G.. North-Holland. [rED]Google Scholar
Duncan-Johnson, C. C. & Donchin, E. (1977) On quantifying surprise: The variation of event-related potentials with subjective probability. Psychophysiology 14(5):456–67. [PU]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eriksen, B. A. & Eriksen, C. W. (1974) Effects of noise letters upon the identification of target letter in a nonsearch task. Perception & Psychophysics 16:143–49. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eriksen, C. W. & Schultz, D. W. (1979) Information processing in visual search: A continuous flow conception and experimental results. Perception and Psychophysics 25:249–63. [rED]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eriksen, C. W., Coles, M. G. H., Morris, L. R. & O'Hara, W. P. (1985) An electromyographic examination of response competition. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23:165–68. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eysenck, H. J. (1986) The theory of intelligence and the psychophysiology of cognition, In: Advances in the psychology of human intelligence, ed. Sternberg, R. J.. Erlbaum. [rED, MJ]Google Scholar
Fabiani, M., Gratton, G., Karis, D. & Donchin, E. (1987) The definition, identification, and reliability of measurement of the P300 component of the event-related brain potential. In: Advances in psychophysiology, vol. 2, ed. Ackles, P. K., Jennings, J. R. & Coles, M. G. H.. JAI Press. [rED]Google Scholar
Fabiani, Karis D. & Donchin, E. (1986) P300 and recall in an incidental memory paradigm. Psychophysiology 23:298308. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
(1990) Effects of strategy manipulation in a von Restorff paradigm. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 75:2235. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gratton, G., Coles, M. G. H., Sirevaag, E. J., Eriksen, C. W. & Donchin, E. (1988) Pre- and poststimulus activation of response channels: A psychophysiological analysis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 14:331–44 [rED]Google ScholarPubMed
Helson, H. (1964) The adaptation level theory. An experimental and systematic approach to behavior. Harper & Row. [PU]Google Scholar
Hillyard, S. A. & Hansen, J. C. (1986) Attention: Electrophysiological approaches. In: Psychophysiology: Systems, processes, and applications, ed. Coles, M. G. H., Donchin, E. & Forges, S. W.. Guilford Press. [rED]Google Scholar
Johnson, R., Jr. & Donchin, E. (1978) On how P300 amplitude varies with the utility of the eliciting stimuli. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 44:424–37. [rED]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Junghanns, G. & Ullsperger, P. (1989) The P300 amplitude of the eventrelated brain potential (ERP) indicates changes within a frame-of-reference. Zeitschrift fur Psychologie 197:387–94. [PU]Google Scholar
Karis, D., Druckman, D., Lissak, R. & Donchin, E. (1984) A psychophysiological analysis of bargaining: ERPs and facial expressions. In: Brain and information: Event-related potentials, ed. Karrer, R., Cohen, J. & Teuting, P.. New York Academy of Sciences. [rED]Google Scholar
Karis, D., Fabiani, M. & Donchin, E. (1984) P300 and memory: Individual differences in the von Res torff effect. Cognitive Psychology 16:177216. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kutas, M. & Hillyard, S. A. (1980) Reading senseless sentences: Brain potentials reflect semantic incongruity. Science 207:203–05. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kutas, M. & Van Petten, C. (1988) Event-related brain potential studies of language. In: Advances in psychophysiology, ed. Ackles, P. K., Jennings, J. R. & Coles, M. G. H.. JAI Press. [rED]Google Scholar
Lauterbach, W. & Sarris, V. (1980) Beiträge zur psychologischen Bezugssystemforschung. Huber. [PU]Google Scholar
Luce, R. D. (1986) Response times: Their role in inferring elementary mental organization. Oxford University Press. [rED]Google Scholar
Markowitsch, H. J. (1988) Problems with brain origins. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11:389–90. [MJ]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyer, D. E., Osman, A. M., Irwin, D. E. & Yantis, S. (1988) Modern mental chronometry. Biological Psychology 26:367. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Miller, J. (1988) Discrete and continuous models of human information processing: Theoretical distinctions and empirical results. Acta Psychologica 67:191257. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
(1990) Discreteness and continuity in models of human information processing. Acta Psychologica 74:297318. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Naatanen, R. (1990) The role of attention in auditory information processing as revealed by event-related potentials and other brain measures of cognitive function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13:201–88. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nelson, C. A. & Salapetek, P. (1986) Electrophysiological correlates of infant recognition memory. Child Development 57:1483–97. [MJ]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rabbitt, P. M. A. (1985) Oh g, Dr. Jensen! or, g-ing up cognitive psychology? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8:238–39. [rED, MJ]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
(1988) Has the P300 been cost effective? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11:390–92. [MJ]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rohrbaugh, J. W., Donchin, E. & Eriksen, C. W. (1974) Decision making and the P300 component of the cortical evoked response. Perception & Psychophysics 15:368–74. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rugg, M. D. (1985) The effects of word repetition and semantic priming on event-related potentials. Psychophysiology 22:642–47. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
(1987) Dissociation of semantic priming, word and non-word repetition by event-related potentials. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 39A: 123–48. [rED]Google Scholar
Rugg, M. D. & Nagy, M. E. (1987) Lexical contribution to non-word repetition effects: Evidence from event-related potentials. Memory and Cognition 15:473–81. [rED]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sanders, A. F. (1990) Issues and trends in the debate on discrete vs. continuous processing of information. Acta Psychologica 74:123–67. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smid, H. G. O. M., Mulder, G. & Mulder, L. J. M. (1990) Selective response activation can begin before stimulus recognition is complete: A psychophysiological and error analysis of continuous flow. Acta Psychologica 74:169201. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Townsend, J. T. & Ashby, F. G. (1983) Stochastic modeling of elementary psychological processes. Cambridge University Press. [rED]Google Scholar
Ullsperger, P. & Gille, H.-G. (1988) The late positive component of the ERP and the adaptation-level theory. Biological Psychology 26:299306. [PU]CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ullsperger, P., Gille, H.-G. & Metz, A.-M. (1987) The P300 as a metric in psychophysics of cognitive processes. In: Evoked potentials III. The third international evoked potential symposium, ed. Barber, C. & Blum, T.. [PU]Google Scholar
Verleger, R. (1988t) Event-related potentials and cognition: A critique of the context updating hypothesis and an alternative interpretation of P3. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11:343–56. [rRV, PU]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
(1988r) Author's response: From epistemology to P3ology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11:399408. [rRV]CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 4
Total number of PDF views: 7 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Event-related potentials and cognition: On unexpected events and on the utility of event-related potentials
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Event-related potentials and cognition: On unexpected events and on the utility of event-related potentials
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Event-related potentials and cognition: On unexpected events and on the utility of event-related potentials
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *