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But is it social? How to tell when groups are more than the sum of their members

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2016

Allison A. Brennan
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada allison_brennan@sfu.ca
James T. Enns
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. jenns@psych.ubc.ca
Corresponding

Abstract

Failure to distinguish between statistical effects and genuine social interaction may lead to unwarranted conclusions about the role of self-differentiation in group function. We offer an introduction to these issues from the perspective of recent research on collaborative cognition.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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