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Brain structures playing a crucial role in the representation of tools in humans and non-human primates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Guido Gainotti
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosciences, Neuropsychology Center, Policlinico Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome, Largo A. Gemelli, 8Italy. gainotti@rm.unicatt.it

Abstract

The cortical representation of concepts varies according to the information critical for their development. Living categories, being mainly based upon visual information, are bilaterally represented in the rostral parts of the ventral stream of visual processing; whereas tools, being mainly based upon action data, are unilaterally represented in a left-sided fronto-parietal network. The unilateral representation of tools results from involvement in actions of the right side of the body.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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