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Body image and body schema: The shared representation of body image and the role of dynamic body schema in perspective and imitation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2007

Alessia Tessari
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy. alessia.tessari@unibo.itannamaria.borghi@unibo.ithttp://www.emco.unibo.it/groupAT.htmhttp://laral.istc.cnr.it/borghi
Anna M. Borghi
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy. alessia.tessari@unibo.itannamaria.borghi@unibo.ithttp://www.emco.unibo.it/groupAT.htmhttp://laral.istc.cnr.it/borghi

Abstract

Our commentary addresses two issues that are not developed enough in the target article. First, the model does not clearly address the distinction among external objects, external body parts, and internal bodies. Second, the authors could have discussed further the role of body schema with regard to its dynamic character, and its role in perspective and in imitation.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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