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Automatic processes, emotions, and the causal field

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 January 2014

Robin M. Hogarth
Affiliation:
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Department of Economics & Business, 08005 Barcelona, Spain. robin.hogarth@upf.edu
Corresponding
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Abstract

Newell & Shanks (N&S) provide a welcome examination of many claims about unconscious influences on decision making. I emphasize two issues that they do not consider fully: the roles of automatic processes and emotions. I further raise an important conceptual problem in assigning causes to potential unconscious influences. Which “causal field” is relevant: that of the investigator or the experimental participants?

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

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