Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Teaching Children With Down Syndrome in the Early Years of School*

  • Amanda McFadden (a1), Donna Tangen (a1), Rebecca Spooner-Lane (a1) and Amanda Mergler (a1)

Abstract

We explored 3 general classroom teachers’ experiences of including a child with Down syndrome in their early years classrooms. Located at 3 different Australian school settings, 1 teacher was the head of a Preparatory class, 1 was a Year 3 teacher, and the third was a teacher of a split Preparatory/Year 1 class. Interview data were drawn from a larger study, in which data were gathered over a 5-month period through class observations and teacher interviews. The findings indicate that although there were highly inclusive experiences identified in the school sites, the school context played an important role in the inclusion of the child. Teachers indicated that receiving targeted information about Down syndrome and collaborative support from parents, teaching colleagues, and their wider school enabled them to work more inclusively with their student with Down syndrome in their classroom.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Amanda McFadden, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove Campus, Victoria Park Road, Qld 4059, Australia. Email: a1.mcfadden@qut.edu.au

Footnotes

Hide All
*

This manuscript was accepted under the Editorship of Michael Arthur-Kelly.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
Abbeduto, L., Pavetto, M., Kesin, E., Weissman, M. D., Karadottir, S., O'Brien, A., & Cawthon, S. (2001). The linguistic and cognitive profile of Down syndrome: Evidence from a comparison with fragile X syndrome. Down Syndrome Research and Practice, 7, 915. doi:10.3104/reports.109
Armstrong, D., Armstrong, A. C., & Spandagou, I. (2011). Inclusion: By choice or by chance? International Journal of Inclusive Education, 15, 2939. doi:10.1080/13603116.2010.496192
Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. (2013). Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. Retrieved from https://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/teacher-accreditation/how-accreditation-works/guide-to-accreditation/professional-standards
Avramidis, E., & Norwich, B. (2002). Teachers’ attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 17, 129147. doi:10.1080/08856250210129056
Commonwealth of Australia. (1992). Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Retrieved from https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2016C00763
Corbett, J. (2001). Supporting inclusive education: A connective pedagogy. New York, NY: RoutledgeFalmer.
Creswell, J. W. (2013). Qualitative inquiry & research design: Choosing among five approaches (3rd ed.). London, UK: Sage.
Davis, A. S. (2008). Children with Down syndrome: Implications for assessment and intervention in the school. School Psychology Quarterly, 23, 271281. doi:10.1037/1045-3830.23.2.271
Dharan, V. M. (2015). Beginning teachers and diversity – why the need for extended critical professional support. Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 43, 6174. doi:10.1080/1359866X.2014.940840
Florian, L., & Rouse, M. (2010). Teachers’ professional learning and inclusive practice. In Rose, R. (Ed.), Confronting obstacles to inclusion: International responses to developing inclusive education (pp. 185199). London, UK: Routledge.
Forlin, C. (2010). Teacher education for inclusion. In Rose, R. (Ed.), Confronting obstacles to inclusion. International responses to developing inclusive education (pp. 155170). London, UK: Routledge.
Forlin, C., Chambers, D., Loreman, T., Deppeler, J., & Sharma, U. (2013). Inclusive education for students with disability: A review of the best evidence in relation to theory and practice. Canberra: Australian Research Alliance for Children & Youth.
Forlin, C., Keen, M., & Barrett, E. (2008). The concerns of mainstream teachers: Coping with inclusivity in an Australian context. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 55, 251264. doi:10.1080/10349120802268396
Fox, S., Farrell, P., & Davis, P. (2004). Factors associated with the effective inclusion of primary-aged pupils with Down's syndrome. British Journal of Special Education, 31, 184190. doi:10.1111/j.0952-3383.2004.00353.x
Gilmore, L., Campbell, J., & Cuskelly, M. (2003). Developmental expectations, personality stereotypes, and attitudes towards inclusive education: Community and teacher views of Down syndrome. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 50, 6576. doi:10.1080/1034912032000053340
Horne, P. E., & Timmons, V. (2009). Making it work: Teachers’ perspectives on inclusion. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 13, 273286. doi:10.1080/13603110701433964
Huang, H.-H., & Diamond, K. E. (2009). Early childhood teachers’ ideas about including children with disabilities in programmes designed for typically developing children. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 56, 169182. doi:10.1080/10349120902868632
Norwich, B., & Lewis, A. (2001). Mapping a pedagogy for special educational needs. British Educational Research Journal, 27, 313329.
Patton, M. Q. (2002). Qualitative research & evaluation methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Rietveld, C. M. (2008). Contextual factors affecting inclusion during children's transition from preschool to school. Australian Journal of Early Childhood, 33 (3), 19.
Rose, R. (Ed.). (2010). Confronting obstacles to inclusion: International responses to developing inclusive education. London, UK: Routledge.
Ruijs, N. M., Van der Veen, I., & Peetsma, T. T. D. (2010). Inclusive education and students without special educational needs. Educational Research, 52, 351390. doi:10.1080/00131881.2010.524749
Savolainen, H., Engelbrecht, P., Nel, M., & Malinen, O.-P. (2012). Understanding teachers’ attitudes and self-efficacy in inclusive education: Implications for pre-service and in-service teacher education. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 27, 5168. doi:10.1080/08856257.2011.613603
Sermier Dessemontet, R., Morin, D., & Crocker, A. G. (2014). Exploring the relations between in-service training, prior contacts and teachers’ attitudes towards persons with intellectual disability. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 61, 1626. doi:10.1080/1034912x.2014.878535
Shaddock, A. J., Hook, J., Giorcelli, L., Smith, S., Elliott, A., Hoffman-Raap, L., . . . Woolley, G. (2007). Improving the learning outcomes of students with disabilities in mainstream classes: A review of the literature from a practice standpoint. In Shaddock, A., Smyth King, B., & Giorcelli, L. (Eds.), A project to improve the learning outcomes of students with disabilities in the early, middle and post compulsory years of schooling (pp. 10125). Canberra: Australian Government Department of Education, Science and Training. Retrieved from http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/78123/20071019-1322/www.dest.gov.au/sectors/school_education/publications_resources/profiles/report.pdf
Varcoe, L., & Boyle, C. (2014). Pre-service primary teachers’ attitudes towards inclusive education. Educational Psychology, 34, 323337. doi:10.1080/01443410.2013.785061
Waitoller, F. R., & Artiles, A. J. (2013). A decade of professional development research for inclusive education: A critical review and notes for a research program. Review of Educational Research, 83, 319356. doi:10.3102/0034654313483905

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Teaching Children With Down Syndrome in the Early Years of School*

  • Amanda McFadden (a1), Donna Tangen (a1), Rebecca Spooner-Lane (a1) and Amanda Mergler (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.