Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Alternative usage of common feeding grounds by large predators: the case of two hakes (Merluccius hubbsi and M. australis) in the southwest Atlantic

  • Alexander I. Arkhipkin (a1), David A. J. Middleton (a1), Julio M. Portela (a2) and Jose M. Bellido (a2)

Abstract

Monthly variations in spatial and depth distributions, sex ratios, and maturity status in two species of hakes, Merluccius hubbsi and M. australis, were analysed in an area where their ranges overlap spatially on the shelf and slope around the Falkland Islands, and in international waters at 45–47° S (High Seas), using data collected by scientific observers on commercial fishing vessels. A variety of exploratory analyses were carried out on the raw data before patterns were quantified using generalised additive models. Both species use the areas studied as their feeding grounds. M. australis occur mainly on the Falkland shelf south of 51° S, whereas M. hubbsi is widely distributed throughout both the Falkland and High Seas shelf areas. Preliminary schemes of the seasonal migrations of both hakes in Falkland waters and on the High Seas are suggested and discussed. M. hubbsi and M. australis are found to be boldly segregated, both spatially and temporally, on their common feeding grounds, thus avoiding potential inter-specific competition for food resources.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Keywords

Alternative usage of common feeding grounds by large predators: the case of two hakes (Merluccius hubbsi and M. australis) in the southwest Atlantic

  • Alexander I. Arkhipkin (a1), David A. J. Middleton (a1), Julio M. Portela (a2) and Jose M. Bellido (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed