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We can no longer afford a monolingual norm

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 March 2010

Barbara Zurer-Pearson*
Affiliation:
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Extract

In her Keynote Article, Johanne Paradis does a service for the research and the clinical communities with this comprehensive review of the literature encompassing bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI). Her work and the work of her colleagues for more than a decade have been persistent in bringing these two threads together: using bilingual (BL) data to speak to theoretical issues and using research findings to inform clinical practice. I am not alone in my appreciation (and admiration) of her many contributions, which are nicely pulled together here and placed in better perspective than in the several articles that have presented much of the work in isolation.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

Collier, V., & Thomas, W. P. (2004). The astounding effectiveness of dual language education for all. NABE Journal of Research and Practice, 2, 120.Google Scholar
Cummins, J. (1979). Cognitive/academic language proficiency, linguistic interdependence, the optimum age question and some other matters. Working Papers on Bilingualism, 19, 121129.Google Scholar
Kohnert, K. (2004). Processing skills in early sequential bilinguals. In Goldstein, B. (Ed.), Bilingual language development and disorders in Spanish–English speakers (pp. 5376). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.Google Scholar
Kohnert, K., & Bates, E. (2002). Balancing bilinguals II: Lexical–semantic production and cognitive processing in children learning Spanish and English. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 45, 347359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leonard, L. (1998). Children with specific language impairment. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google ScholarPubMed
Oller, D. K., Pearson, B. Z., & Cobo-Lewis, A. B. (2007). Profile effects in early bilingual language and literacy. Applied Psycholinguistics, 28, 191230.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pearson, B. Z. (1993). Predictive validity of the SAT-verbal scores for high-achieving Hispanic college students. Hispanic Journal of the Behavioral Sciences, 15, 342356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steenge, J. (2006). Bilingual children with specific language impairment: Additionally disadvantaged? Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Research Centre on Atypical Communication, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Google Scholar
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