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Distinguishing African American English from developmental errors in the language production of toddlers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2005

RAMONDA HORTON–IKARD
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison
SUSAN ELLIS WEISMER
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin–Madison

Abstract

This study examined the use of nonstandard forms in the language production of typically developing toddlers. Forty-four African American and White children, ages 2.5 and 3.5 years, were assigned to one of four groups based on their chronological age and linguistic background. Language sample analysis and a listener judgment task were used to evaluate nonstandard speech. Results indicated that 2.5- and 3.5-year-old toddlers from African American English backgrounds produced similar amounts of nonstandard speech. However, 2.5-year-old toddlers from standard American English backgrounds produced greater amounts of nonstandard speech than their 3.5-year-old peers.

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Articles
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

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