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Warrior ideologies in first-millennium AD Europe: new light on monumental warrior stelae from Scotland

  • Mark Hall (a1), Nicholas Evans (a2), Derek Hamilton (a3), Juliette Mitchell (a2), James O'Driscoll (a2) and Gordon Noble (a2)...

Abstract

The evidence of funerary archaeology, historical sources and poetry has been used to define a ‘heroic warrior ethos’ across Northern Europe during the first millennium AD. In northern Britain, burials of later prehistoric to early medieval date are limited, as are historical and literary sources. There is, however, a rich sculptural corpus, to which a newly discovered monolith with an image of a warrior can now be added. Comparative analysis reveals a materialisation of a martial ideology on carved stone monuments, probably associated with elite cemeteries, highlighting a regional expression of the warrior ethos in late Roman and post-Roman Europe.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: ✉ g.noble@abdn.ac.uk

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Warrior ideologies in first-millennium AD Europe: new light on monumental warrior stelae from Scotland

  • Mark Hall (a1), Nicholas Evans (a2), Derek Hamilton (a3), Juliette Mitchell (a2), James O'Driscoll (a2) and Gordon Noble (a2)...

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