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‘Forest Moss’: no part of the European Neanderthal diet

  • James H. Dickson (a1), Klaus Oeggl (a2) and Daniel Stanton (a3)

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In recent years, the study of Palaeolithic people has been a vigorous, productive topic, with the increasing knowledge of diet contributing significantly to the debate's liveliness (e.g. Richards 2009; Henry et al. 2010; Hardy et al. 2012, 2016; El Zaatari et al. 2016).

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*Author for correspondence (Email: prof.j.h.dickson@gmail.com)

References

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‘Forest Moss’: no part of the European Neanderthal diet

  • James H. Dickson (a1), Klaus Oeggl (a2) and Daniel Stanton (a3)

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