Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The first evidence for Late Pleistocene hominin populations on the southern Caspian Sea coast

  • Hamed Vahdati Nasab (a1), Kourosh Roustaei (a2), Mohammad Ghamari Fatideh (a3), Fatemeh Shojaeefar (a4) and Milad Hashemi Sarvandi (a1)...

Extract

The southern shore of the Caspian Sea is well known for its great potential in relation to sites of Mesolithic date (e.g. Coon 1951; Jayez & Vahdati Nasab 2016). Situated between two major geographic barriers—the Alborz Mountains to the south, and the Caspian Sea to the north—this area has been considered one of the major hominin dispersal corridors during the Pleistocene–Holocene transition (Vahdati Nasab et al. 2013). Furthermore, the relatively stable and mild climatic conditions, vast and lush temperate forests, and abundance of fauna and water resources have all made this region an attractive niche for human settlement.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The first evidence for Late Pleistocene hominin populations on the southern Caspian Sea coast
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The first evidence for Late Pleistocene hominin populations on the southern Caspian Sea coast
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The first evidence for Late Pleistocene hominin populations on the southern Caspian Sea coast
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence (Email: vahdati@modares.ac.ir)

References

Hide All
Coon, C.S. 1951. Cave explorations in Iran 1949. Philadelphia: The University Museum, University of Pennsylvania.
Jayez, M. & Vahdati Nasab, H.. 2016. A separation: Caspian Mesolithic vs Trialetian lithic industry (a research on excavated site of Komishan, south-east of Caspian Sea). Paléorient 42: 81100.
Vahdati Nasab, H., Clark, G.A. & Torkamandi, S.. 2013. Late Pleistocene dispersal corridors across the Iranian Plateau: a case study from Mirak, a Middle Paleolithic site on the northern edge of the Iranian Central Desert (Dasht-e Kavir). Quaternary International 300: 267–81. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2012.11.028

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

The first evidence for Late Pleistocene hominin populations on the southern Caspian Sea coast

  • Hamed Vahdati Nasab (a1), Kourosh Roustaei (a2), Mohammad Ghamari Fatideh (a3), Fatemeh Shojaeefar (a4) and Milad Hashemi Sarvandi (a1)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.