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The worms of Roman horses and other finds of intestinal parasite eggs from unpromising deposits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Andrew K.G. Jones
Affiliation:
Environmental Archaeology Unit, University of York, York YO1 5DD
Andrew R. Hutchinson
Affiliation:
Environmental Archaeology Unit, University of York, York YO1 5DD
Colin Nicholson
Affiliation:
Environmental Archaeology Unit, University of York, York YO1 5DD

Extract

The preservation of organic remains and environmental indicators in those soft, damp and colourful deposits that visually indicate ancient excreta is familiar. This note reports a horse parasite, and draws attention to preservation of valuable material in deposits much less promising in nature.

Type
Notes
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd 1988

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References

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