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Theory and practice in Russian and Soviet archaeology: retrospect and prospect

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2017

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin
Affiliation:
Sobolev Institute of Geology & Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia; and Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050, Russia (Email: kuzmin@fulbrightmail.org; kuzmin_yv@igm.nsc.ru)
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Extract

Despite the fact that several books and a plethora of articles have been published in recent decades on the archaeology of the USSR and Russia, Soviet-Russian archaeology is still largely ignored in the West (e.g. Fagan 2003, but see Trigger 2006: 230–32, 326–44). For non-Russian scholars, the first acquaintance with it can be nightmarish; for example, Anthony (2007: 164) describes the periodisation of the Aeneolithic Cucuteni-Tripolye culture of Ukraine and Moldova (parts of the USSR before 1991), and Romania:

There is a Borges-like dreaminess to the Cucuteni pottery sequence: one phase (Cucuteni C) is not a phase at all but rather a type of pottery probably made outside the Cucuteni-Tripolye culture; another phase (Cucuteni A1) was defined before it was found, and never was found.

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Book reviews
Information
Antiquity , Volume 91 , Issue 360 , December 2017 , pp. 1652 - 1655
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd, 2017 

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References

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