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Special section Dynamic landscapes and socio-political process: the topography of anthropogenic environments in global perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Christopher T. Fisher
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706-1393, USA
Tina L. Thurston
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology, Baylor University, Waco TX 76798, USA

Extract

Sander Van Der Leeuw, in his recent plenary address at the 1998 Society for American Archaeology Meetings, suggested that archaeology as a discipline has moved its emphasis from site to settlement pattern, and now to the landscape. Though a landscape focus is not new, especially for the social sciences (Coones 1994; Cosgrove 1984; Glacken 1967; Jackson 1994}, the landscape approach in archaeology (Wagstaff 1987) is still in its infancy.

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Special section
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 1999

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