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Mending the past: Ix Chel and the invention of a modern pop goddess

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Traci Ardren*
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Dept of Anthropology, University of Miami, P.O. Box 248106, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA

Extract

For modern communities, she is the moon goddess and protectress of Maya culture and women; for scholars she is one of a number of deities with different roles in the Postclassic period. Which is the real Ixchel? The author excavates the story of the Maya goddess and her re-invention by myth-makers – including archaeologists.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 2006

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