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Headroom and human trampling: cave ceiling-height determines the spatial patterning of stone artefacts at Petzkes Cave, northern New South Wales

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015


Robert Theunissen
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology and Palaeoanthropology, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia. rtheunis@powerup.com.au wbeck@metz.une.edu.au
Jane Balme
Affiliation:
Centre for Archaeology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands WA 6907, Australia. jbalme@cyllene.uwa.edu.au
Wendy Beck
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology and Palaeoanthropology, University of New England, Armidale NSW 2351, Australia. rtheunis@powerup.com.au wbeck@metz.une.edu.au

Abstract

Going into a cave or shelter, one walks where one can stand upright or has to crouch less. That affects which zones objects are trampled on, which zones they may be kicked out of, which zones they may be kicked into. And those effects interact with the usual spatial order–with its activity zones and drop zones–that develops through occupation of the enclosed cave or shelter.


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Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 1998

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Headroom and human trampling: cave ceiling-height determines the spatial patterning of stone artefacts at Petzkes Cave, northern New South Wales
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