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Grey waters bright with Neolithic argonauts? Maritime connections and the Mesolithic–Neolithic transition within the ‘western seaways’ of Britain, c. 5000–3500 BC

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Duncan Garrow
Affiliation:
School of Archaeology, Classics & Egyptology, University of Liverpool, Hartley Building, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GS, UK
Fraser Sturt
Affiliation:
Archaeology, University of Southampton, Avenue Campus, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BF, UK

Abstract

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Research article
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd 2011

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References

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Grey waters bright with Neolithic argonauts? Maritime connections and the Mesolithic–Neolithic transition within the ‘western seaways’ of Britain, c. 5000–3500 BC
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